Lumbee Tribal Council member receives award for service to National Guard and U.S. Army

Tomeka Sinclair Staff writer

			
				                                Col. Micheal Marciniak, director of Strategic Plans and Policies for the National Guard, presents Lumbee Tribal Councilman Terry Hunt with the North Carolina Association Certificate and the Old North State Award for his 28 years of service in the U.S. Army and National Guard. The presentation occurred at the Council’s monthly business meeting.
                                 Tomeka Sinclair | The Robesonian

Col. Micheal Marciniak, director of Strategic Plans and Policies for the National Guard, presents Lumbee Tribal Councilman Terry Hunt with the North Carolina Association Certificate and the Old North State Award for his 28 years of service in the U.S. Army and National Guard. The presentation occurred at the Council’s monthly business meeting.

Tomeka Sinclair | The Robesonian

<p>Ten of the 44 2021 Scholarship and Agriculture recipients were recognized and presented certificates Thursday during the Lumbee Tribal Council meeting. The awards ranged from $500 to $1,000.</p>
                                 <p>Tomeka Sinclair | The Robesonian</p>

Ten of the 44 2021 Scholarship and Agriculture recipients were recognized and presented certificates Thursday during the Lumbee Tribal Council meeting. The awards ranged from $500 to $1,000.

Tomeka Sinclair | The Robesonian

PEMBROKE — Tribal Councilman Terry Hunt was honored Thursday for his 28 years of service in the U.S. Army and National Guard during the Lumbee Tribal Council meeting.

Before sharing his personal experiences of serving beside Hunt, Col. Michael Marciniak, director of Strategic Plans and Policies for the National Guard, presented him with the North Carolina Association Certificate and the Old North State Award.

The Old North State Award, which is presented on behalf of Gov. Roy Cooper, is for National Guard service members who have served no less than 20 years and who have expressed a “dedication of service beyond expectation.”

The North Carolina Association Certificate also honors National Guard retirees.

“You reached this status through years of sacrifice, hard work and dedication to both this great country and state,” a letter sent to Hunt on behalf of the Association reads in part.

Hunt said he learned two weeks ago that he was being bestowed the honors.

“A lot of us, we dedicate our life to serve the state and the country. It makes a big difference to know that people still recognize us. The reason we do it is for the country,” Hunt said. “Maybe some way it can influence young people to strive to make things better. That’s one of the things that I always tried to do.”

Marciniak said he has saw firsthand how deserving Hunt is of the award.

“I’ve known Terry since probably 1998, when he was a staff sergeant in the North Carolina National Guard,” the colonel said. “We’ve deployed three combat deployments to Iraq and then the last deployment I was fortunate enough to have Terry with me was as my command sergeant major in Jordan, where we had the opportunity to train the Jordanian Armed Forces.”

Also Thursday, 44 2021 Scholarship and Agriculture recipients were recognized for their educational accomplishments. Ten of the recipients were presented certificates and congratulated by their Tribal Council district representative.

Recipients present included, Haley Oxendine, District 1; Makaylie Jacobs, District 2; Jada Allen, District, 3; Aaron Dial, District 5; Carrington Harris, District 6; Zachary Scott, District 8; Jayla Locklear, District 9; Kirsten Locklear, District 10; Tristen Locklear, District 10; and Jamie Brunson, District 13.

The awards ranged from $500 to $1,000.

“You showed not only your intellect, but your special interest, your pride and identity as Native Americans, and your concern for others and your dedication to church and to God, and we’re proud of each of you,” said Yvonne Dial, chair of the Council’s Education Committee.

In business matters Thursday, the Tribal Council approved a motion that supports Upstream USA. According to the nonprofit’s website, it “works to expand opportunity by reducing unplanned pregnancy across the U.S. We work in partnership with health centers to strengthen reproductive care and autonomy by increasing equitable access to the full range of contraceptive options.”

The item was voted down at June’s meeting after District 2 representative Gerald Goolsby asked for more information about the organization because of his concerns with how it may conflict with his “religious beliefs on abortion.”

“I done the research that I was wanting to do. I’ve looked into this organization. The understanding I got — the reduction rate in abortion is greatly enhanced by this. I was not against this program. I just didn’t have enough information, so therefore I would like to give it my full support tonight,” Goolsby said Thursday.

The council also voted to appoint Whitney Bell to a five-year term on the North Carolina Indian Housing Authority board. Bell will be sworn in at the August meeting.

Tomeka Sinclair can be reached at [email protected] or 910-416-5865.